Posters and Talks

Statistical learning and learning to read (symposium in honour of Kate Nation)

Date: 

March, 2022

Venue: 

Experimental Psychology Society

Multiple sources of evidence support the idea that reading and visual word identification build upon statistical regularties in the (written) language. However, direct experimental evidence for this connection is still meager, and sometimes mixed (e.g., bigram frequency effects). Focusing on children, I present evidence that, yes, there is evidence for sensitivity to letter statistics in natural reading for comprehension, specifically in the form of nGram frequency effects that can't be traced back to word-level statistics.

The connection between statistical learning and reading: how far does it go?

Date: 

March, 2022

Venue: 

Oxford University and Queen Mary University of London

Multiple sources of evidence support the idea that reading and visual word identification build upon statistical regularities in the (written) language. However, statistical learning is surely not a language-specific engine, and seems to be deeply embedded into the visual system. This begs the question: how special is letter and word processing, really? In this talk, I'll try to define the connection between statistical learning and reading at the boundary between language and perception, addressing questions like; How does statistical learning affect morphological processing?

Morphemes as letter chunks: Linguistic information enhances the learning of visual regularities

Date: 

January, 2022

Venue: 

EWCN2022: European Workshop on Cognitive Neuropsychology, Bressanone (OnlyOnline)

Using an artificial script, we have previously demonstrated that readers use co-occurrence statistics to learn about the presence and position of af ix-like chunks in strings of pseudo-letters (Lelonkiewicz, Ktori & Crepaldi, 2020). These findings were taken as evidence that visual statistical learning might be implicated in morphological processing during visual word recognition.

The role of morphology in the learning of words: A Registered Report

Date: 

January, 2022

Venue: 

EXCN2022: European Workshop on Cognitive Neuropsychology, Bressanone (OnlyOnline)

The majority of the new words that we learn everyday as adults are morphologically complex; yet, we don’t know much about the role of morphology in novel word learning. A recent study by Ginestet et al. (2020) showed that morphological structure: (i) facilitates processing of complex nonwords (RElerbER) compared to simple ones (pelerble) in early stages of processing; (ii) shows mixed ef ects when it comes to orthographic learning.

Letter co-occurrence statistics affects individual letter identification

Date: 

November, 2021

Venue: 

62nd Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Virtual, November 4-7, 2021

Reading involves an interaction of linguistic and perceptual processes, in which top-down, lexical knowledge aids letter perception. Does such facilitation interact with letter co-occurrence regularities? Skilled readers were briefly exposed to strings of five consonants; critically, letters in position 2 and 4 were embedded in either high (L in e.g., GLVTZ) or low (e.g., NLRTZ) transitional probability (TP) triplets. When presented with two strings differing by the critical letter (GLVTZ vs.

Temporal dynamics of semantic processing in sensorimotor convergence zones

Date: 

November, 2021

Venue: 

Neurocog 2021, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, November 23-24 2021

Conceptual representation routinely draws upon modality-specific information: a bear is fast and noisy; a lemon is yellow and rounded. Understanding where and when this information converges in the brain is fundamental to a complete understanding of semantic knowledge. Neuroimaging studies have identified several ‘convergence zones’ which handle semantic information from different modalities, but further data on when information converges is vital to illuminate the role these regions play in comprehension.

Anything special about visual word identification?

Date: 

February, 2021

Venue: 

Department talk at the Institut du Cerveau, Paris

Cross-word priming during sentence reading

Date: 

January, 2021

Venue: 

Congress of the Experimental Psychology Society, UK

There is little contact between theories of individual word identification and sentence processing models. In this talk, I present a study, led by Katarina Marjanovic and carried out in collaboration with Yamil Vidal, where we tried to bridge this gap by assessing cross-word priming during natural reading. By combining eye tracking and EEG, we found that cross-word semantic priming (“…the cat and the dog…” vs. “…the table and the dog…”) is solid and strong, both in eye tracking metrics and in Fixated-Related Potentials (FRPs). This is not the case for morphological priming (“…the cat and the dog…” vs. “…the cats and the dog…”), which doesn’t seem to emerge in sentence context.

Automatic morpheme identification in reading development: MEG evidence from Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation

Date: 

October, 2020

Venue: 

Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL) Annual Meeting, virtual edition, October 21-24, 2020

Morphemes are the smallest linguistic units that carry meaning (e.g., a complex word such as artist is composed of a stem, art-, and a suffix, -ist).

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