Posters and Talks

A developmental database of eye movement measures during natural reading

Date: 

May, 2020

Venue: 

Psycholinguistics in Flanders 2020, Kaiserslautern, Germany, May 7-8 2020 - POSTPONED due to Coronavirus emergency (to Fall 2020 or May 2021)

A highly ecological ability such as reading is often investigated through non-ecological experimental paradigms. The present work aims at complementing this approach by providing the community with a developmental database of eye movement measures during natural reading. Eye movements were recorded from a large sample of Italian developing readers (N=140), aged 8–11, as they read 12 multi-lined passages taken from story books for children (1566 tokens and 762 distinct types). Eye-tracking data were also recorded from a group of skilled adult readers (N=33), for comparison.

Form, function, meaning. A study on the distribution of inflectional morphemes in Italian

Date: 

February, 2020

Venue: 

19th International Morphology Meeting - Vienna, Austria - 6-8 February 2020

On the one hand, inflectional morphology can encode semantic features, such as numerosity or sex; on the other, its has a functional role. The agreement of morphological features disambiguates the relations between constituents in sentence parsing, and reduces processing effort by favoring word predictions (Dye et al., 2017; Wicha et al., 2004). Ideally, those processes should be favored by consistency between form and features.

Processing of compound constituents: position-specificity and interpretability

Date: 

February, 2020

Venue: 

19th International Morphology Meeting, Vienna, Austria, 6-8 February 2020

Constituent morphemes within complex words are identified during visual word processing, and likewise the presence of real morphemes slows down pseudoword rejection. Previous studies suggest that the identification of constituents in compound words is, to a certain degree, position-independent, reflecting the fact that constituents can occur in any position within compounds across the language (e.g., boathouse - houseboat). However, some stems occur more often in the first position of a compound (e.g., doorstep, doorstop, doorknob, doorbell vs.

The role of semantics in learning morphological systems. An artificial lexicon experiment

Date: 

February, 2020

Venue: 

19th International Morphology Meeting - Vienna, Austria - 6-8 February 2020

Whereas lexical words can encode potentially any meaning about the referential world, inflectional morphology encodes only a limited set of semantic features. Such features are cross-linguistically consistent and seem closely related to salient aspects of the environment processed by core knowledge systems: Tense encodes time perception, Number encodes numerosity, Gender systems are often based on animacy. Why are some features constantly present across languages grammars? And why are others, such as color, never attested?

Early morphological decomposition: MEG evidence from Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation

Date: 

December, 2019

Venue: 

Workshop on Australiasian Magnetoencephalography (WAM), Sydney, Australia, December 10-13, 2019

Here we investigate the neural representation of morphemes, both stems and suffixes, in a Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation (FPVS) paradigm combined with MEG. We find that the brain automatically detects morphological structure in stimuli that are entirely made up of morphemes, but not in nonwords that contain only a stem, or only a suffix. Further exploration of the neural sources behind these sensor-level data will provide more refined spatial information on the brain mechanisms underlying morpheme identification.

The role of affixes in the visual identification of words and nonwords

Date: 

November, 2019

Venue: 

International Morphological Processing Conference (MoProc), Tübingen, Germany, November 4-7, 2019

The exact mechanisms that govern the visual identification of complex words (e.g., build-er) are not entirely clear. In particular, it is not obvious why the system would identify (pseudo–)morphemes in words that only have an appearance of morphological complexity (e.g., corn–er, iron–y). One hypothesis is that this phenomenon is driven by letter co–occurrence regularity - morphemes are also recurrent clusters of letters.

Behavioural and Neural Correlates of Visual Word Learning

Date: 

September, 2019

Venue: 

21st conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology - Tenerife, Spain - 25-28 September 2019

We learn new words via our everyday reading experience, but the precise mechanisms behind this learning are still unclear. In this experiment we tracked the development of lexical representations in adults combining behavioural measures of lexical processing with EEG signatures of visual word sensitivity. Participants learned novel letter strings using two different routines, one based on the standard explicit procedure typically used in the literature, and one based on a more pro-active feedback-based learning.

Bigram coding as a general visual mechanism (Nothing special about reading?)

Date: 

September, 2019

Venue: 

21st conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology - Tenerife, Spain - 25-28 September 2019

We showed that bigram coding is a general visual mechanism that also applies to visual material that is very different from letters and words, for example because it's not arranged horizontally, or because it refers to abstract visual features that are not even spatially segregated. 

Morphological Decomposition: Deboosting affixes

Date: 

September, 2019

Venue: 

21st conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, Tenerife, Spain, September 25-28, 2019

Words can be decomposed into smaller meaningful units, known as morphemes (e.g., BUILD–ER). Available data suggest this to happen in rightfully complex words (e.g., deal-er), pseudo-complex words (e.g., corn-er), and also when the stimulus is a nonword composed of a real stem and a real affix (e.g., chair-er). On the contrary, the absence of an affix (e.g., cash-ew) seems to result in a lack of decomposition. Are affixes necessary to trigger morphological analysis?

Pseudo-Letter Chunking in Novel Words Through Problabilistic Information

Date: 

September, 2019

Venue: 

21st conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology - ESCoP 2019, 25-28 September 2019, Tenerife

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