Posters and Talks

Temporal Dynamics of lexical and semantic features of spoken words: an MEG study

Date: 

July, 2019

Venue: 

Salzburg Mind-Brain Annual Meeting (SAMBA 2019), July 11-12, 2019

The temporal dynamics of spoken word recognition are highly debated. While some studies suggest serial processing of sublexical and lexico-semantic information (e.g., Kocagoncu et al., 2017), others reported parallel processing since early stages (e.g., Lewis & Poeppel, 2014). The current study employed multiple linear regression to predict MEG-evoked responses in 20 native Italian speakers during the semantic judgment of 438 Italian spoken words.

Discovering the Lexicon's Statistical Structure in Reading

Date: 

June, 2019

Venue: 

Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning, San Sebastian, Spain, June 27-29, 2019

Humans are known to detect probabilistic regularities in learning materials. In language, this ability is particularly well-evidenced for the auditory modality. In two experiments, we tested if learners rely on statistical regularities also when processing text. Italian speakers performed a lexical decision task on a large set of letter strings, distinguishing between nonword strings and strings that were words in a novel language. Participants successfully detected that novel words complied with the statistics of the Italian lexicon, and used this information to perform the task.

Morphological priming of inflectional suffixes

Date: 

June, 2019

Venue: 

The 12th Mediterranean Morphology Meeting (MMM12), Ljubljana, 27-30 June 2019

N–gram coding as a general–purpose visual learning tool

Date: 

June, 2019

Venue: 

Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning, San Sebastian, Spain, June 27-29, 2019

It has been suggested that the visual word identification system identifies recurrent letter clusters (n–grams) as a bridge between letters and words. Some evidence may suggest, rather indirectly, that n–gram coding is a more general visual mechanism, used beyond reading to extract statistical regularities in smaller visual units to build larger visual units. Here we test this hypothesis directly, and explore the boundaries of the phenomenon—what type of visual object, if any, fails n–gram based statistical learning?

Visual Statistical Learning beyond sequential presentation: The case of Reading

Date: 

June, 2019

Venue: 

Interdisciplinary Advances in Statistical Learning, San Sebastian, Spain, June 27-29, 2019

Alphabetic writing systems use combinations of individual characters (e.g., letters) to convey information. These combinations exhibit complex statistical regularities whose role in reading is hotly debated in the psycholinguistic community. This theoretical problem could be approached using the framework of Statistical Learning, but most work done so far in visual statistical learning use sequential presentation of stimuli, leaving reading-like material rather unexplored.

Temporal Dynamics of lexical and semantic features of spoken words: an MEG study

Date: 

May, 2019

Venue: 

Rovereto Workshop on Concepts, Actions, and Objects: Functional and Neural Perspectives, May 2-4, 2019

The temporal dynamics of spoken word recognition are highly debated. While some studies suggest serial processing of sublexical and lexico-semantic information (e.g., Kocagoncu et al., 2017), others reported parallel processing since early stages (e.g., Lewis & Poeppel, 2014). The current study employed multiple linear regression to predict MEG-evoked responses in 20 native Italian speakers during the semantic judgment of 438 Italian spoken words.

Temporal dynamics of lexical and semantic features of spoken words

Date: 

March, 2019

Venue: 

Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) Annual Meeting, San Francisco, 26-29 March 2019

Temporal dynamics of spoken word recognition: an MEG study

Date: 

February, 2019

Venue: 

Giornate di studi sperimantali sul linguaggio SSSL 2019, 11-12 Febbraio 2019

Discovering Lexicon’s Statistical Structure Contributes to Word Learning

Date: 

November, 2018

Venue: 

59th Annual Meeting Psychonomic Society. New Orleans, 15-18 November 2018

Learners detect probabilistic regularities in linguistic materials (Saffran & Kirham, 2018). In two experiments, we tested if this ability is active in reading and may underlie word learning. Italian speakers were shown letter strings and instructed to distinguish between novel words and foil distractors. Participants successfully detected that novel words complied with the statistics of Italian lexicon, and used this information to perform the task. Interestingly, among the several possible variables, they relied particularly on single bigram frequency.

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