Published Papers

MultiPic: A standardized set of 750 drawings with multilingual norms

Journal: 

Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (in press)

Date: 

March, 2017

Numerous studies in psychology, cognitive neuroscience and psycholinguistics have used pictures of objects as stimulus materials. Currently, authors engaged in cross-linguistic work or wishing to run parallel studies at multiple sites where different languages are spoken must rely on rather small sets of black-and-white or colored line drawings. These sets are increasingly experienced as being too limited. Therefore, we constructed a new set of 750 colored pictures of concrete concepts.

The nature of semantic priming by subliminal spatial words. Embodied or disembodied?

Journal: 

Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145, 1160-1176

Date: 

September, 2016

Theories of embodied semantics (ES) suggest that a critical part of understanding what a word means consists of simulating the sensorimotor experience related to the word’s referent. Some proponents of ES have suggested that sensorimotor activations are mandatory and highly automatic during semantic processing. Evidence supporting this claim comes from masked priming studies showing that unconsciously perceived spatial words (e.g., up, down) can directly modulate action performance on the basis of their meaning.

The fruitless effort of growing a fruitless tree: Early morpho-orthographic and morpho-semantic effects in sentence reading

Journal: 

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition., 41, 1587-1596

Date: 

September, 2015

In this eye-tracking study, we investigated how semantics inform morphological analysis at the early stages of visual word identification in sentence reading. We exploited a feature of several derived Italian words, that is, that they can be read in a “morphologically transparent” way or in a “morphologically opaque” way according to the sentence context to which they belong. This way, each target word was embedded in a sentence eliciting either its transparent or opaque interpretation.

Processing differences across regular and irregular inflections revealed through ERPs

Journal: 

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 41, 747-760

Date: 

June, 2015

Research strongly suggests that printed words are recognized in terms of their constituent morphemes, but researchers have tended to consider the recognition of derivations and inflections in separate theoretical debates

Masked suffix priming and morpheme positional constraints

Journal: 

Quartely Journal of Experimental Psychology

Date: 

May, 2015

Although masked stem priming (e.g., dealer–DEAL) is one of the most established effects in visual word identification, it is less clear whether primes and targets sharing a suffix(...)

Space and time in the sighted and blind

Journal: 

Cognition, 141, 67-72

Date: 

April, 2015

Across many cultures people conceptualize time as extending along a horizontal Mental Time Line (MTL)

Semantic transparency in free stems: the effect of Orthography–Semantics Consistency in word recognition

Journal: 

Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 68, 1571-1583

Date: 

January, 2015

A largely overlooked side effect in most studies of morphological priming is a consistent main effect of semantic transparency across priming conditions. That is, participants are faster at recognizing stems from transparent sets (e.g., farm) in comparison to stems from opaque sets (e.g., fruit), regardless of the preceding primes. This suggests that semantic transparency may also be consistently associated with some property of the stem word.

Morphological processing of printed nouns and verbs: Cross-class priming effects

Journal: 

Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 26, 433-460

Date: 

March, 2014

Despite grammatical class being a fundamental organising principle of the human mental lexicon, recent morphological models of visual word identification remain silent as to whether and how it is represented in the lexical system. The present study addresses this issue by investigating cross-class morphological priming (i.e., the effect obtained when nouns prime verbs sharing the same root or vice versa) to clarify whether morphological stems subserving the formation of both nouns and verbs (e.g., depart-) have a unique, grammatical class–independent representation.

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