Published Papers

The psycholinguistic and affective structure of words conveying pain

Journal: 

PLoS ONE, 2018 Jun 29;13(6):e0199658. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199658

Date: 

June, 2018

Despite the flourishing research on the relationships between affect and language, the characteristics of pain-related words, a specific type of negative words, have never been systematically investigated from a psycholinguistic and emotional perspective, despite their psychological relevance. This study offers psycholinguistic, affective, and pain-related norms for words expressing physical and social pain. This may provide a useful tool for the selection of stimulus materials in future studies on negative emotions and/or pain.

MultiPic: A standardized set of 750 drawings with multilingual norms

Journal: 

Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2018), 2018 Apr;71(4):808-816. doi: 10.1080/17470218.2017.1310261

Date: 

March, 2017

In this paper we describe a novel set of 700+ coloured images that we created and, most importantly, validated across six different languages (British English, Spanish, French, Dutch, Italian and German). Click on the title to read the full abstract and access the paper.

The nature of semantic priming by subliminal spatial words. Embodied or disembodied?

Journal: 

Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145, 1160-1176

Date: 

September, 2016

Theories of embodied semantics (ES) suggest that a critical part of understanding what a word means consists of simulating the sensorimotor experience related to the word’s referent. Some proponents of ES have suggested that sensorimotor activations are mandatory and highly automatic during semantic processing. Evidence supporting this claim comes from masked priming studies showing that unconsciously perceived spatial words (e.g., up, down) can directly modulate action performance on the basis of their meaning.

The fruitless effort of growing a fruitless tree: Early morpho-orthographic and morpho-semantic effects in sentence reading

Journal: 

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, Vol 41(5), 1587-1596

Date: 

September, 2015

In this eye-tracking study, we investigated how semantics inform morphological analysis at the early stages of visual word identification in sentence reading. We exploited a feature of several derived Italian words, that is, that they can be read in a “morphologically transparent” way or in a “morphologically opaque” way according to the sentence context to which they belong. This way, each target word was embedded in a sentence eliciting either its transparent or opaque interpretation.

Processing differences across regular and irregular inflections revealed through ERPs

Journal: 

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol 41(3), 747-760

Date: 

June, 2015

Research strongly suggests that printed words are recognized in terms of their constituent morphemes, but researchers have tended to consider the recognition of derivations and inflections in separate theoretical debates. Recently, Crepaldi et al. (2010) proposed a theory that claims to account for the recognition of both derivations and inflections.

Masked suffix priming and morpheme positional constraints

Journal: 

Quartely Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69(1), 113–128

Date: 

May, 2015

Although masked stem priming (e.g., dealer–DEAL) is one of the most established effects in visual word identification (e.g., Grainger et al., 1991), it is less clear whether primes and targets sharing a suffix (e.g., kindness–WILDNESS) also yield facilitation (Giraudo & Grainger, 2003; Duñabeitia et al., 2008).

Space and time in the sighted and blind

Journal: 

Cognition, 141, 67-72

Date: 

April, 2015

Across many cultures people conceptualize time as extending along a horizontal Mental Time Line (MTL). This spatial mapping of time has been shown to depend on experience with written text, and may also depend on other graphic conventions such as graphs and calendars. All of this information is typically acquired visually, suggesting that visual experience may play an important role in the development of the MTL. Do blind people develop a MTL? If so, how does it compare with the MTL in sighted?

Semantic transparency in free stems: the effect of Orthography–Semantics Consistency in word recognition

Journal: 

Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 68(8), 1571-1583

Date: 

January, 2015

A largely overlooked side effect in most studies of morphological priming is a consistent main effect of semantic transparency across priming conditions. That is, participants are faster at recognizing stems from transparent sets (e.g., farm) in comparison to stems from opaque sets (e.g., fruit), regardless of the preceding primes. This suggests that semantic transparency may also be consistently associated with some property of the stem word.

How to become twice more precise in detecting neuropsychological impairments

Journal: 

Frontiers in Psychology, n. 65

Date: 

October, 2014

Although it was a giant leap forward when it was introduced, the classic approach to the norming of neuropsychological tests (Capitani, 1987) has two main limitations: (i) it doesn’t consider possible interactions between covariates (e.g., age and education); (ii) working on by–subject percentages of correct responses, it cannot consider item covariates (e.g., frequency, length, imageability) that are known to affect performance substantially. Here we show how to overcome these limitations, and how this improves our diagnosis.

Pages

Subscribe to Published Papers