Published Papers

Lexical and semantic access in Letter-by-Letter Dyslexia: A case report

Journal: 

Brain and Language, 95, 225–226

Date: 

October, 2005
Letter-by-letter (LBL) dyslexia is a reading impairment caused by left occipital damage and characterized by significant increase in reading time according to the number of letters in a given string (word length effect). In analogy to Dejerine’s (1892) interpretation of
pure alexia, this disorder is said to be the consequence of a disconnection of the word-blind right hemisphere (RH) from the left hemisphere (LH) word recognition system (angular gyrus). According to this view, patients affected by LBL dyslexia would have no

Naming of nouns and verbs in aphasia: preliminary results of a word retrieval task in a sentence context

Journal: 

Brain and Language, 91, 150-151

Date: 

October, 2004
Several authors described cases of dissociated impairment in naming nouns and verbs. There are four accounts of this dissociation: (i) patients may have purely lexical damage, which selectively affects verbs or nouns at a late stage of the linguistic processing (phonological or orthographic lexicons) (Rapp & Caramazza, 2002); (ii) the damage affects a lexical device, either at an ortographic-phonological modality-specific level (the lexeme; Levelt, Roelofs, & Meyer, 1999) or at a unitary lexical–syntactic level (the lemma

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