Published Papers

Effects of grammatical class and morphological structure in Chinese: A mixed logit model study on picture and word naming

Journal: 

Procedia: social & behavioral sciences, 6, 139-140

Date: 

October, 2010

Lexical-semantic variables such as word frequency, imageability and age of acquisition have long been studied in order to shed light on the cognitive processes underlying the cognitive performance of normal and aphasic speakers (Nickels & Howard, 1995). However, little is known about the role of these variables in Chinese.

 

‘Fell’ primes ‘fall’, but does ‘bell’ prime ‘ball’? Masked priming with irregularly‑inflected primes

Journal: 

Journal of Memory and Language, 63, 83‑99

Date: 

July, 2010

Recent masked priming experiments have brought to light a morphological level of analysis that is exclusively based on the orthographic appearance of words, so that it breaks down corner into corn- and -er, as well as dealer into deal- and -er (Rastle, Davis, & New, 2004).

Morphemes in their place: evidence for position‑specific identification of suffixes

Journal: 

Memory and Cognition, 38, 312-321

Date: 

April, 2010

Previous research strongly suggests that morphologically complex words are recognized in terms of their constituent morphemes. A question thus arises as to how the recognition system codes for morpheme position within words, given that it needs to distinguish morphological anagrams like overhang and hangover. The present study focused specifically on whether the recognition of suffixes occurs in a position-specific fashion.

Head position and the mental representation of Italian nominal compounds

Journal: 

The Mental Lexicon, 4, 430‑455

Date: 

August, 2009

There is a significant body of psycholinguistic evidence that supports the hypothesis of an access to constituent representation during the mental processing of compound words. However it is not clear whether the internal hierarchy of the constituents (i.e., headedness) plays a role in their mental lexical processing and it is not possible to disentangle the effect of headedness from that of constituent position in languages that admit only head-final compounds, like English or Dutch.

Nouns and verbs in the brain: Grammatical class and task specific effects as revealed by fMRI

Journal: 

Cognitive Neuropsychology, 25 , 528 – 558

Date: 

August, 2008

The wide variety of techniques and tasks used to study the neural correlates of noun and verb processing has resulted in a body of inconsistent evidence. We performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment to detect grammatical class effects that generalize across tasks. A total of 12 participants undertook a grammatical-class switching task (GCST), in which they were presented with a noun (or a verb) and were asked to retrieve the corresponding verb (or noun), and a classical picture naming task (PNT) widely used in the previous aphasiological and imaging literature.

Brain areas underlying retrieval of nouns and verbs: Grammatical class and task demand effects

Journal: 

Brain and Language, 103, 156-157

Date: 

November, 2007

Current data on the neural correlates of noun and verb processing are inconsistent as studies using different imaging techniques and/or different tasks have provided remarkably different results.

Noun-verb dissociation in aphasia: type/token differences in the analysis of spontaneous speech

Journal: 

Brain and Language, 99, 8-219

Date: 

November, 2006

Many studies on aphasia have described disproportioned impairment of either verbs or nouns and have broached the issue of mental implementation of the grammatical class distinction.

Verb-Noun double dissociation in aphasia: theoretical and neuroanatomical foundations

Journal: 

Cortex, 42, 875-883

Date: 

September, 2006

This paper reports the results of several studies on the mechanisms underlying Verb-Noun (V-N) dissociation. The objectives of the studies were to ascertain the location of the lesions causing predominant V or N impairment and to shed light on the different mental representations of these word classes through analyses of the data from neuropsychological patients.

Noun-verb dissociation in aphasia: The role of imageability and functional locus of the lesion

Journal: 

Neuropsychologia, 44, 73-89

Date: 

January, 2006

Aphasic patients occasionally manifest a dissociated naming ability between objects and actions: this phenomenon has been interpreted as evidence of a separate organization for nouns and verbs in the mental lexicon. Nevertheless Bird et al. [Bird, H., Howard, D., Franklin, S. (2000). Why is a verb like an inanimate object? Grammatical category and semantic category deficits.

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